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How to create email newsletters (that your subscribers will actually read)

Author
Robert Brandl

how to create an email newsletter

Information on email marketing for small and medium-sized businesses, online stores, and bloggers

Last updated: 18 June 2018

 

Sometimes the world of email marketing can seem a little complicated. How do you make sure your subscription process won’t get you into legal trouble? How do you maintain your list of subscribers? And how do you even get subscribers in the first place?

We’re going to answer these questions (and a few more) in this article, alongside a step-by-step video on how to create and send newsletters.

Here’s what we’ll cover:

First – what, exactly, is an email newsletter?

create a newsletter
An email newsletter is an email which is sent out on a regular basis (e.g. weekly or monthly). It can be in HTML (displayed within a design) or in plain text format.

As you’ll probably know by looking at your inboxes, email newsletters are a popular medium for businesses. 83% of B2B marketers, for example, send email newsletters as part of their content marketing strategy.

Typically, newsletters focus on providing informative content to subscribers (they’re not called newsletters for nothing!). It might feature just one topic, or include content relating to different topics.

Newsletters are different to other types of marketing emails, such as autoresponders (e.g. welcome emails), transactional or triggered/automated emails. However, they can sometimes overlap. Each has an important part to play in any successful email marketing strategy, so newsletters should be used to complement these emails, rather than being an alternative to them.

What are the advantages of email newsletters?

  • Regularly keeping in touch with subscribers keeps you front-of-mind. This increases your chances of converting them into customers
  • It’s much less expensive than traditional media (such as print products)
  • The medium is quicker to deliver and easier to create
  • You can actively measure your results. This enables you to tailor your content to the demand, while also keeping an eye on your ROI
  • Purchases and registration can be combined without switching from one medium to another
  • Thanks to their smartphones, your subscribers will receive email newsletters wherever they are

What are the disadvantages of email newsletters?

  • The tactile experience of a print product is lost
  • Emails are deleted relatively fast and are often read on the fly
  • The number of email newsletters in people’s inboxes is already quite high

Despite the disadvantages, it’s hard to ignore the strong arguments in favour of sending email newsletters. Cost-effectiveness is probably the most compelling of these, as they’re relatively cheap to send. And email marketing, on the whole, provides an average ROI of 3800% (according to Salesforce). That's good enough reason for us!

What should I include in an email newsletter?

Traditional newsletters (such as the print variety) tended to be more company-focused. They often contained company announcements, new product releases, awards, and other generally snooze-worthy information.

Boring newsletters

Put yourself in the shoes of the reader. If you had subscribed to your company’s newsletter, what sort of information would you want to see? And what would quickly make you hit ‘unsubscribe’?

The very best email newsletters we’ve seen (and the ones that usually perform better) feature content that’s relevant to the reader. Often, it’s information that’s:

  • Useful – for example, tips, or links to ‘how to’ articles, tutorials or guides
  • Timely – think of all the marketing you see around Superbowl, Coachella or at Christmas. There’s a simple reason for this: people are interested!
  • Newsworthy – a recent development in your industry, for example, could make compelling content for your readers.
  • Special offers, promotions and freebies – these can include sales, discounts, or even digital freebies such as ebooks and webinars.
  • Personalized, tailored content – if your email tool allows this, you can send content based on the reader’s interests and preferences (think of Amazon’s ‘Products we recommend’ newsletters, based on readers’ purchases). It’s a strategy that actually works – research has found that personalization improves click-through rates by 14% and conversions by 10%.

Some examples of great email newsletters

NetflixNetflix email newsletter

Their newsletters are simple, but brilliant. Check out this one promoting the last season of House of Cards, styled as an email from the president. It certainly grabs your attention! We also love that they regularly include animated GIFs from their TV shows within their newsletters – what better way to bring their product to life?

 

Society6

Society6 newsletter

At EmailToolTester, we are suckers for good design, and that’s why we love online art retailer Society6’s newsletter. Each one feels handcrafted, with eye-catching illustrations and designs. There’s also plenty of interesting content for their artistically-inclined audience. We don’t even mind receiving their regular promotional emails, as they’re always so beautifully presented!

 

theSkimm

theSkimm email newsletter

A good newsletter doesn’t need to be heavily centred on graphics. theSkimm is a newsletter that provides short, snackable bites of daily news to its busy readers (specifically, female millenials). The content is primarily text, but subscribers take the time to read it. Why? Firstly, because the convenient format solves a legitimate problem for them (not being able to stay up to date with current events). And finally, because it’s written in an engaging and relatable tone.

What makes each of these newsletters work? It’s simple – each has been created with their specific audience in mind. Are your readers likely to be on-the-go? Make your email mobile-responsive, and your text short and succinct. Are they more creative, visual people? Focus on design and images. And if you have multiple audiences, tailored newsletters is the way to go.

Finally, another important consideration is frequency. In an ideal world, subscribers would choose how often they receive emails from you. This isn’t always possible though, so be sure to choose a frequency that’s useful to your readers, without being annoying (warning – it’s a very fine line!).

How do you actually create a newsletter?

Once you have the content locked down, you’d be surprised how simple the process of creating a newsletter is! The following video shows you how an email newsletter is created, using GetResponse as an example.

As is the case with most providers, GetResponse offers a graphical editing interface. Using the drag & drop editor, you can add the building blocks you want to your newsletter. It’s incredibly easy, and you don’t need any programming skills.

Newsletter creation starts at minute 1:25.

> Click here for some in-depth reviews on a variety of newsletter tools.
(The link will open in a new window)

And what features should I be looking for in professional email software?

newsletter toolTo run a newsletter mailing list, an absolute must is list management. This will enable you to maintain a list of subscribers in a database and filter and sort them into groups. Depending on the software, integration into CRM systems may be possible, but it’s not always a simple task.

And then you’ll need an editor to create the newsletter. One of the features you’ll need is the ability to test the design in popular email and webmail clients (such as Outlook, Gmail, and Apple Mail).

But don’t forget that you'll also need some well-defined processes, such as subscribing and unsubscribing, as well as a way to deal with invalid email addresses.

All of the tools we review on EmailToolTester provide the above features – you can check them out here.

Do I need an email server of my own in order to send out email newsletters?

A lot of components come together when sending out an email newsletter: a software or web application that creates the newsletter, and an email server that sends it out. Generally speaking, you’re free to manage each of these components separately. You can install the newsletter software on your server or client computer, and then use the email server provided by your web hosting provider (e.g. Namecheap or GoDaddy).

Unfortunately, most of these email servers aren't suitable for sending out a massive number of emails. Most servers shut you down when you try to send out several hundred emails in an hour. One way to deal with this issue is moving to an external email server such as Mailjet or SendInBlue.

Another option, which is really more theoretical than anything else, is running your own email server. A quick cost/benefit analysis often makes this an unrealistic option for most small businesses. Sending out emails isn’t that much of a problem. However, if your email server doesn’t have a good sender reputation, your emails won’t be accepted by major email services such as Gmail, Yahoo, AOL etc.

If you want to take the easy way out, you can opt for a hosted email system. Here, the provider doesn’t only give you access to the newsletter software – it also takes care of maintenance as well as deliverability for you. You'll often get some templates to start with, too. These kinds of newsletter tools are our focus here at EmailToolTester:

> Here’s a list of newsletter providers that don’t require an additional email server.

And how much does it cost to send out a newsletter?

kostenIn theory, sending out HTML emails is free. You just open up your usual email program (e.g. Outlook) and you’re good to go. However, you’ll probably run into several problems pretty quickly. First of all, creating HTML emails in Outlook is rather complicated. And secondly, you have no means of analysis, or automating subscriptions or unsubscribes.

However, a good newsletter tool doesn’t have to be expensive. In fact, there are several providers who offer plans that are completely free. Even if you need expert features, and have an ever-growing subscriber list, your marketing budget may be able to cover this quite easily. For instance, if you want your email newsletters to reach 5,000 people in a month, you’re looking at somewhere between $25 and $45. And if your emails go out at irregular intervals you can use a prepaid plan, meaning you only pay when you actually send out a newsletter.

Go ahead and check out our newsletter calculator if you want to get a better idea of how much email marketing might cost you! Just enter the number of emails you think you might want to send in a month, and the calculator will tell you what the most popular providers have to offer.

Legally speaking, what do I have to be aware of when using email marketing?

There are two legal concepts you should know about:

USAlaw
The CAN SPAM Act states that you can send (almost) as many emails as you want as long as the recipient does not unsubscribe (opt-out principle). However, there are a number of email services (such as Mailchimp) that will demand proof of an existing opt-in for your subscribers.

This is due to the fact that it’s not good for a newsletter provider when large numbers of people complain about emails sent through their servers. Many people will simply mark your newsletter as spam and, all of a sudden, the email service provider’s server is moved to a blacklist. Obviously, the provider will want to avoid that.

EU and Canada
In Canada, there’s a different principle. In this case, you need to be able to prove that the recipient explicitly subscribed to your newsletter. The best way of doing this is through a double opt-in procedure. Here, the subscriber receives a confirmation email with a link they have to click, in order to actually join the mailing list.

Countries within the EU take this even further. The introduction of the GDPR means that, aside from having double opt-ins in place, companies must be crystal clear in the language used on sign-up forms, and have defined procedures in place for processing and storing data (among other stringent requirements).

There are some exceptions – existing business relationships, for instance. If you have a current customer, you can usually send them emails without their explicit consent. If you want to find more information on legal questions regarding email newsletters, follow this link to read up on the legal situation in the USA, Canada, and the EU.

What about purchased email lists?
There are providers who try to sell you such lists and, in some cases, they even have opt-in proof which would hold up in a court of law. However, most email services we know of won’t let you use those kinds of lists. They don’t want to risk their good sender reputation, so they prohibit the use of purchased mailing lists. Statistics clearly show that the number of complaints is higher than the number of successful clicks for such lists.

So how do I get people to subscribe to my email newsletter?

In the long run, your best strategy is good content. If your content adds value to people’s lives in some way, they will talk about, and recommend, it. So try and stay away from sales-driven advertising emails as much as possible. Instead, we recommend you use email marketing to invest in good customer relations.

You can also boost your subscription numbers by offering benefits: Our sister site, WebsiteToolTester, for instance, found out that offering a free ebook to every new subscriber caused significant growth (by a factor of ten in this case). A pop-up can get you even further – but be careful not to annoy your readers!

Next steps

All you need is the right provider?

> Here’s our newsletter tool comparison

More tips and tools can be found here:

> Take a look at our free email marketing resources

Download free newsletter templates here:

> 700 free responsive newsletter templates